Primary Care Providers Can Lower the Cost of Healthcare

Posted by Continuum on Apr 18, 2017 11:02:00 AM

Today’s patients have numerous choices of hospitals, urgent care, and other ambulatory care centers when they seek treatment. While primary care providers (PCPs) can typically help patients with these decisions, patients sometimes visit these facilities before consulting their PCPs for treatment or preventative care. Expensive hospital visits can drive up healthcare costs and have a negative impact on quality overall—but fortunately, PCPs have some options to help keep costs down. 

PCPs lower healthcare utilization

Independent PCPs emphasize quality of care through their personalized interactions and relationships with their patients. When PCPs are readily available in a community, patients are less likely to seek treatment at a specialized facility, hospital, or urgent care center.1 Unnecessary emergency room visits are a drain on the nation’s healthcare system when the source of the visit could have been treated or prevented by a primary care provider.

PCPs focus on establishing a rapport with their entire patient population. These relationships allow doctors to draw conclusions about a patient’s overall health or potential illnesses on an ongoing basis. Consistent, meaningful visits build a bond between patient and provider, which encourages the patient to seek treatment from his or her PCP over a hospital physician.

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Topics: cost of care, lower cost of care, independent physician, hospital employment, Primary Care Providers

Independence vs. Employment for Physicians

Posted by Continuum on Mar 21, 2017 11:01:00 AM

Is employment really the answer?

Hospital employment, with its promises of financial security, fewer administrative duties, and more stable working hours offer a strong case for physicians.  From 2007 to 2016, the number of independent physicians has decreased by 28 percent.1,2 Many physicians have opted for employment within a large health organization because it appears more appealing than fighting to maintain an independent practice; but the number of physicians pushing for independence may be on the rise.

This shift is being triggered as physicians find those promises aren’t always grounded in reality. Physicians feel that an employed position will require less administrative tasks and thereby provide more time to spend with patients. Yet administrative duties are inescapable. Most physicians are still required to maintain quality of care reporting and accurate EHR entries, whether they are independent or employed.

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Topics: independent physician practice, independent physician, hospital employment

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